Sentencing/Post Conviction

4002 ABA Journal Sentencing/Post Conviction articles.

Afternoon Briefs: Bill would allow law school to ax segregationist’s name; Cipollone said to be material witness

Florida legislation puts naming rights in universities’ hands

Thanks to pending legislation, Florida State University College of Law may soon rename B.K. Roberts Hall, which recognizes a former state supreme…

Convicted murderer who presented evidence of his lawyer’s racist views wins 9th Circuit appeal
The en banc 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at San Francisco has granted relief to a convicted murderer who contended he was entitled to a new trial because of his appointed lawyer’s racist views.
Felons in Florida must pay all fees and fines before they can vote, state’s top court says
Felons in Florida have to pay fees, fines and restitution before their voting rights are restored, according to a Florida Supreme Court advisory opinion.
11th Circuit upholds dismissal of juror who said Holy Spirit told him to acquit former congresswoman
A federal judge didn’t err when he dismissed a juror who declared that the Holy Spirit told him a former congresswoman was innocent in an alleged charity scam, a federal appeals court has ruled in a 2-1 decision.
Afternoon Briefs: Michael Avenatti is accused of bail violations; Virginia is 38th state to ratify ERA

Michael Avenatti is arrested for alleged bail violations

The lawyer who once represented adult film actress Stormy Daniels has been arrested for alleged bail violations. The federal government contends that,…

New study finds black people are staying longer in state prisons, even as they face fewer arrests

The racial disparity between black and white people sent to state prisons is declining, and it has been for some time. But criminal justice researchers say people of all races still aren’t treated equally when it comes to one important measure: time serve

Afternoon Briefs: Harvey Weinstein threatened with jail for courtroom phone use; Supreme Court closes for weather

Judge threatens to jail Harvey Weinstein after he uses cellphone in court

On Tuesday, a Manhattan judge threatened to jail former film producer Harvey Weinstein for using his cellphone in…

Afternoon Briefs: Ex-DA convicted for covering up cop’s crime; Ginsburg reacts to Trump tweet

Former Long Island DA is convicted of obstruction

Former Suffolk County, New York, District Attorney Thomas Spota was convicted of obstruction of justice Tuesday for conspiring to cover up…

Use of death penalty remains ‘near historic lows,’ while public support wanes
The federal effort to resume executions stands in stark contrast to a state trend away from capital punishment, according to a year-end report by the Death Penalty Information Center.
Afternoon Briefs: Retired lawyer liable for son’s death; SCOTUS rejects homelessness case

93-year-old retired lawyer is found liable for son’s shooting death

On Friday, jurors in San Diego found a 93-year-old retired lawyer liable for $9.5 million in damages for killing his…

Man is charged for allegedly throwing metal water pitcher at sentencing judge, hitting her in the head
A Baltimore man accused of throwing a metal water pitcher at his sentencing judge, hitting her in the forehead, has been charged in the incident.
SCOTUS refuses to interfere with temporary halt to federal executions
The U.S. Supreme Court refused Friday to lift a preliminary injunction blocking four federal executions during a review of the lethal injection procedure adopted by the U.S. Department of Justice.
Prosecutor’s closing remarks about defense lawyers lead to new trial for murder defendant
A man who spent 13 years in a South Carolina prison for murder is entitled to a new trial because of the prosecutor’s “blatantly improper” remarks during closing arguments, the South Carolina Supreme Court has ruled.
Meet Paul Skalnik, one of the most prolific jailhouse informants in American history
Paul Skalnik learned about the benefits of being a jailhouse informant when he was in the Harris County Jail in Texas in 1978 for passing bad checks.
Defendant can be required to write essay on respect for judiciary and to delete negative comments, appeals court says
A judge didn’t err when he ordered a frequent Facebook poster who violated a ban on courtroom recording to write an essay on respect for the judiciary and to delete negative posts, according to the North Carolina Court of Appeals.

Read more ...




Web First
Assistant public defender: ‘I just personally like to give back’
Original reporting ...
Topics: Career & Practice
Afternoon Briefs: Bill would allow law school to ax segregationist's name; Cipollone said to be material witness
Complete list of topics ...


Your Voice
9 tips on how to dress for the courtroom
Articles and commentary ...
Podcasts
The court of public opinion: Why litigation PR is a critical component of a case
More podcasts ...