Legal Education

917 ABA Journal Legal Education articles.

Afternoon Briefs: Texas university leader leaves without blame for law school scandal; judge sides with immigrants

Texas Southern University president leaves school with no blame for alleged law school misconduct

Texas Southern University is parting ways with its president without any claims of wrongdoing, which is…

Afternoon Briefs: George Zimmerman sues Dems over tweets; Concordia Law finds new parent school

George Zimmerman sues Buttigieg and Warren over tweets

The neighborhood watch volunteer acquitted in the murder of unarmed teen Trayvon Martin has filed a defamation suit against Democratic presidential candidates…

Afternoon Briefs: Trump agrees he makes AG Barr’s job difficult; fired BigLaw lawyer denies harassment

Trump agrees he makes Barr’s job difficult but keeps tweeting

President Donald Trump acknowledged Tuesday that his tweets make U.S. Attorney General William Barr’s job more difficult, even as he…

All full-time ABA employees are eligible for federal loan forgiveness program after litigation settles
All full-time employees of the ABA are now eligible for the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program following a settlement in the association’s lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Education.
Law schools see an increase in bar passage rates, new ABA data shows
The bar passage rate for first-time test-takers has increased by nearly 5 percentage points, according to data released Monday by the ABA’s Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar.
Afternoon Briefs: Donor says law school not honoring wishes; Justice Thomas says judges aren’t ‘mass media icons’

Attorney disputes his University of Michigan Law School gift

Lance J. Johnson, a Minnesota lawyer who had donated $150,000 to the University of Michigan Law School and had planned to…

Judge who sealed documents about her beach property gets reversed by appeals court
A Connecticut appeals court has vacated a judge’s order sealing two documents about a beach property that she owned in Maine after a law professor stepped in to argue for their release.
Another law school seeks acquisition, after parent university announces closure plan
Concordia University School of Law, a Boise, Idaho, institution with new ABA accreditation, had a 100% bar passage rate for its class of 2016, but its future as of Monday is unknown, following the announcement that its parent school, the Concordia University campus in Portland, Oregon, is closing.
Justice Ginsburg calls for renewed effort to pass Equal Rights Amendment

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg celebrated Monday evening the centennial of the 19th Amendment that gives women the right to vote as a “miracle” and a “first step towards equal citizenship stature for women.” But she still holds out hope for another goal of the suffragist movement—the adoption of the Equal Rights Amendment.

Afternoon Briefs: Equifax hack traced to Chinese military; law prof is under coronavirus quarantine

Chinese military personnel are charged in Equifax hack

Four members of the Chinese military have been indicted in the 2017 hacking of Equifax that gathered names, birth dates and Social…

Texas university moves to fire its president over law school admissions scandal
The president of Texas Southern University may be out of a job after TSU regents alleged that he failed to promptly report information about an admissions scandal at the Thurgood Marshall School of Law.
Training for nonlawyers to provide legal advice will start in Arizona in the fall

The University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law has started a two-year pilot project that licenses a small group of nonlawyers to give limited legal advice on civil matters stemming from domestic violence. The individuals will be known as licensed legal advocates.

No Country for Rural Lawyers: Small-town attorneys still find it hard to thrive

Solving the rural attorney shortage won’t be easy, given that few law graduates appear willing to set up shop in rural America. The situation is only expected to worsen in the near future, given that many lawyers in less-populated counties are approaching retirement age and no younger attorneys have moved in to replace them.

Boalt name is removed from Berkeley Law’s main building
The last name of John Boalt, a 19th-century mining industry baron who favored prohibiting Chinese immigration and also expressed negative views about blacks and Native Americans, has been removed from the University of California at Berkeley School of Law building.
Ohio bar applicant with ‘extreme’ school debt runs into potential character and fitness issues

Cynthia Marie Rodgers, a 2019 law school graduate, with her husband has a total of almost $900,000 in school debt. The Ohio Supreme Court’s board of character and fitness thinks that issue—along with her history of filing many lawsuits and nonpayment of old consumer debts—should prevent her from becoming a lawyer, at least for a few years.

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