Features

654 ABA Journal Features articles.

Cure or Con? Health products touted on social media are slipping by regulators

Social media offers cheap and targeted advertising that regulators don’t have the time or resources to fully monitor. Deceptive health claims that would land a company in court if made on television or radio are slipping by online.

2020 Legal Rebels: It takes a team

Beginning with the 2020 class, we decided to move Legal Rebels to February-March. To mark this new beginning for Legal Rebels, we decided to try something new. Whereas prior classes have mostly featured individuals with the occasional team thrown in, we decided that 2020’s class would be made up entirely of teams.

No Country for Rural Lawyers: Small-town attorneys still find it hard to thrive

Solving the rural attorney shortage won’t be easy, given that few law graduates appear willing to set up shop in rural America. The situation is only expected to worsen in the near future, given that many lawyers in less-populated counties are approaching retirement age and no younger attorneys have moved in to replace them.

Genealogy sites give law enforcement a new DNA sleuthing tool, but the battle over privacy looms

While law enforcement and the public largely welcome the new wave of forensic genealogy, others worry that privacy rights are being eroded by an investigative approach with little regulatory oversight.

Political unrest, violence have forced millions to migrate and seek protection of the rule of law

When countries lack the capacity to stop violence and corruption, and their legal and law enforcement systems lack the ability to hold perpetrators responsible, their people often have no other choice but to seek protection elsewhere.

Lawyers are unleashing a flurry of lawsuits to step up the fight against climate change

Traditionally relegated to the statutory realm of environmental and administrative law, a cadre of attorneys and legal scholars has given the climate change issue a creative facelift that may change the legal landscape—and, they say, could determine the fate of humanity.

Inside the Legal Profession: What the industry looks like in 2019

Law remains an in-demand profession that continues to grow and pay well while making slow, but steady progress when it comes to issues like diversity, technology adoption and employment after graduation from law school.

What lawyers earn in 2019

In the decade since the Great Recession, wages for private lawyers have risen, with the average salary now at $144,230. However, digging deeper into a collection of data released in the last year-and-a-half shows the wealth is not being shared equally across gender, region, client type and practice areas.

The best places to practice in 2019

Should you choose a state that’s already home to tons of attorneys? Or one that costs very little to buy a home? Or maybe in a state that boasts a high concentration of legal jobs?

Meet the 2019 Legal Rebels

When the ABA Journal named the first class of Legal Rebels 10 years ago, the legal industry was undergoing rapid transformation. Ten years later, it’s clear that many of the same issues that drove the original class of Legal Rebels to look for solutions outside the mainstream are still prevalent.

Formerly incarcerated people are building their own businesses and giving others second chances

Formerly incarcerated people have a difficult time separating themselves from their criminal histories, which makes getting jobs a struggle. Even when they’re eligible to get their records sealed or expunged, most don’t go through the process because they are either unaware of how to do it or lack the legal help they need to get it done.

Closing Time: As Whittier Law School prepares to close, its dean tries to soften the blow for students

Closing Time: As Whittier Law School prepares to close, its dean tries to soften the blow for students

Urge to merge: Difficult times for law schools have prompted several to attempt to be acquired by other schools

In the past three years, seven law schools announced plans to partner, gift or sell themselves to universities—all but begging the question: Why would anyone want them?

Lawyers, songs and money: Music that changed the law

Some songs or albums move the law. A band or artist will be involved in a lawsuit so groundbreaking and important that it will set a precedent, either enshrined in law or otherwise binding future generations.

Law, Camera, Action! Attorneys with side gigs as TV commentators are always on call

Lawyers draw from their expertise to explain the law to a wider audience. But whether they appear on cable news or local morning shows, the demands of the format take a leading role.

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