Election Law

743 ABA Journal Election Law articles.

Ex-felons in Florida who can’t afford fees and fines are entitled to vote, 11th Circuit says
Ex-felons in Florida who can’t afford to pay outstanding fees and fines are entitled to vote under a state constitutional amendment restoring voting rights, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday.
Pass laws making it easier for Native Americans and those without addresses to vote, ABA House urges
Ahead of this year’s presidential election, the ABA House of Delegates overwhelmingly passed a pair of resolutions that aim to increase voter participation and minimize voter suppression at the ABA Midyear Meeting in Austin, Texas, on Monday.
Youths 16 to 18 should be allowed to preregister to vote ahead of elections, House of Delegates says
Youths between ages 16 and 18 should be permitted to preregister to vote so they can cast ballots once they reach the legal voting age in their jurisdiction, the ABA House of Delegates said at the midyear meeting Monday in Austin, Texas.
The 2020 ABA Midyear Meeting kicks off in Texas
The 2020 ABA Midyear Meeting opens in the Lone Star State this week, providing ABA members the opportunity to attend hundreds of legal programs and events; hear from recognized law experts; and meet with colleagues in their sections, divisions, committees and councils.
Afternoon Briefs: 2-time SCOTUS litigant gets settlement; at-large judge elections upheld in voting rights case

Florida man wins $875K settlement after two trips to the Supreme Court

A Florida man who won twice in the U.S. Supreme Court will get an $875,000 settlement for his…

Afternoon Briefs: SCOTUS lacks State of the Union majority; judge reverses No More Deaths convictions

Which Supreme Court justices attended the State of the Union?

Only four justices attended the State of the Union on Tuesday. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. was there, even…

How safe is your right to vote?

A book by a University of Baltimore law prof tells the story of historical efforts of voter suppression and the modern-day dangers that face voters now. In this new episode of the Modern Law Library, Gilda R. Daniels talks to Lee Rawles.

Which SCOTUS justices are registered Democrats or Republicans? Fix the Court investigates
Several Supreme Court justices are registered members of political parties, raising questions about appearances at a time when the justices’ associations are under scrutiny, according to the nonpartisan judicial watchdog group Fix the Court.
Dershowitz: Quid pro quo to win election isn’t impeachable when politician thinks it’s in the public interest
President Donald Trump’s impeachment defense lawyer Alan Dershowitz argued Wednesday that a president can’t be impeached for a quid pro quo that is intended to help him win an election when he thinks winning is in the public interest.
Afternoon Briefs: Political climate motivates would-be lawyers; Avenatti trial begins

Is the ‘Trump Bump’ still a thing?

Politics continue to play a role in law school applicants’ decision-making processes, according to recent surveys from Kaplan Test Prep, but less so…

SCOTUS adds cases on wayward presidential electors, contraceptive coverage exemptions
The U.S. Supreme Court added two high-profile cases on Friday to its docket concerning faithless presidential electors and expanded exemptions to mandated contraceptive coverage.
Judge blocks ‘extensive and burdensome’ state law on ballot initiatives
A federal judge in South Dakota ruled Thursday that a new law requiring people who circulate ballot petitions to provide the state with their personal information is unconstitutional.
The 2020 election: 4 threats to anticipate

Several experts shared with the ABA Journal some potential threats from malicious foreign actors and how to counter them ahead of and during the 2020 presidential election.

Chemerinsky: 2019 was all about setting up the blockbuster year 2020 promises to be
The past year was unusual in the U.S. Supreme Court because the justices handed down only a few blockbuster decisions but then filled their docket with a stunning number of cases of potentially great significance to be decided in spring 2020. Interestingly, the court could have taken many of these cases in the October 2018 term for decisions in June 2019, but it did not do so.
About a quarter of money spent on recent state supreme court races came from outside groups, report says
Special interest groups contributed 27% of the $39.7 million spent on state supreme court elections in 2017 and 2018, according to a report released Wednesday.

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