Legal Rebels and Trailblazers speak!

Hear these innovators tell the tales of how they began changing legal practice and where they see law is going in the future.


Reinventing the staid field of legal academic writing

Legal academic publishing isn't synonymous with innovation. The mere mention of it can, for some, bring up repressed memories of the most banal and stuffy aspects of law school. But the Massachusetts Institute of Technology wants to change that.

Finding your niche: How one lawyer built a practice by defending a notorious accused hacker

Leaving BigLaw to start his own firm in 2011, Tor Ekeland quickly learned that his legal education was insufficient for the task at hand.

Diversity in the legal tech community has been slow but steady

The year 2017 was hailed as the "Year of Women in Legal Tech" based on a few high-profile acquisitions and hires.

Expunging records with new technology

Exploring new frontiers in research for the legal industry

How experiential learning in law schools became widely accepted

When Rodney Smolla was featured as a Legal Rebel in 2009, he was in the midst of leading an innovative plan at Washington and Lee University School of Law, which involved eliminating traditional third-year coursework and replacing it with experiential learning.

What’s your brand? Max Miller has some thoughts

It's good to be seen as a "thought leader," but don't call yourself that in marketing materials, says lawyer, professor and small business owner Max Miller.

Avvo founder unwinds as he thinks about the next step

David Van Zandt has made a career out of touching third rails in higher education

When David Van Zandt became dean of what is now Northwestern University's Pritzker School of Law in 1995, he faced a steep learning curve. Up until then, he had never managed an organization of more than a few people.

Nonprofit law pioneer applauds ‘low bono’ growth

Before they were buzzwords, Luz Herrera was a pioneer in the world of "low bono" practice, nonprofit law firms and legal incubators. All three innovations have blossomed and spread across the country since then.

Not content with retirement, Jeff Carr continues the fight against billable hours

Leading advocate for diversity in legal industry hasn’t seen much progress in 10 years

In the 10 years since Emery K. Harlan, co-founder of the National Association of Minority & Women Owned Law Firms, was featured as an ABA Journal Legal Rebel, he says little has changed for diversity in the profession.

From consulting to politics, former Orrick CEO continues to beat the drum for change

When Ralph Baxter joined the inaugural class of Legal Rebels in 2009, he was the CEO and chairman of Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe. Just a year into the biggest recession since the Great Depression, he caught the ABA Journal’s attention through his initiatives that took Orrick from a domestic, California-based firm to an international heavyweight while navigating economic turbulence.

Young lawyers can be technophobes too, says legal tech entrepreneur Monica Goyal

Many lawyers are reluctant to adopt new legal technology, says Monica Goyal, who developed platforms including My Legal Briefcase, which helps parties in the Canadian small claims courts, and Aluvion Law, which uses automation to cut legal services costs for small businesses.

Make room for chatbots at your firm, LawDroid founder says

Chatbots have a place in a law office, says legal chatbot creator Tom Martin, because they can handle busy work that eats up precious time in a lawyer’s day.

Could 80 percent of cases be resolved through online dispute resolution? (podcast)

Perhaps in five to seven years, as Colin Rule sees it, half of U.S. citizens who file court cases will have access to online dispute resolution software walking them step by step through their matters, resolving up to 80 percent of cases.

Legal writing pro is helping teach AI to draft contracts (podcast)

Legal services innovator moves on to app development (podcast)

It’s too easy for attorneys to be aware that something isn’t perfect in their practices and accept the situation instead of pushing back. So says longtime legal innovator Nicole Bradick.

LawPay founder and former cheerleader focuses on what lawyers need (podcast)

Tech is not the only answer to legal aid issues, justice center director Joyce Raby says (podcast)

Since the late 1990s, Joyce Raby has spent a career bringing technology to legal aid. While a booster and believer in technology's potential to improve America's legal system, her experience is tempering.

"We've been saying for a very long time that technology was going to be the saving grace for the justice ecosystem," she says. "I don't think it is."

Page 1 of 3 pages
 1 2 3 >